Origami Interest Group

Back to Lists with information valuable to the Origami Interest Group

Review of Origami book collection (incomplete)

version 1 - 96.05.27 (compiled by Pat Slider)

This file is an INCOMPLETE collection of origami book reviews that were sent to the origami-l mailling list and to my own mailing address. It lists books in the order of the number of times they have been recommended/"voted for", but this should not imply that a book near the bottom is not as good. I think there are some real "sleepers" here, books that are more obscure or on special topics. The "# of recommendations" is an indication on how popular a book is with the mailing list subscribers, but the top-listed books aren't necessarily the best book for YOU. For example, most of the highly-recommended books are for those who mastered complex folding (and for those who like inspiration). The best way to select a new book to try is to read the reviews!
Note again that as this list is incomplete, some titles are suspiciously low, i.e. some Montroll titles, Harbin's "Secrets of Origami", and Gay Merrill Gross's books -- I just haven't searched for recommendations in the archives for these yet! Also, I haven't double-checked all the title and publication information yet. Feel free to GENTLY point out errors :->.
I have totaled the number of times that each book was recommended and then included helpful/useful comments. I had to make a subjective decision sometimes as to whether the poster of the message was "recommending" the book or just mentioning a title in reference to something else, i.e. where to find X model. Another decision that I had to make was if the same person recommended a book multiple times over a space of a few days, does this count as only 1 recommendation? I decided it did....I have tried to be careful with my tallying, but I make no guarantees. Another reason not to let the "# of recommendations" make your decision for you.
When books have the same number of recommendations, they are listed in alphabetical order...at least, I hope they are :->. When available, I also pulled the difficulty ratings from OUSAs Origami Source catalog of supplies -- figuring that these were probably fairly accurate. (I agree that difficulty ratings are a subjective art.)

Feel free to send me email with additional reviews, corrections, etc....

pat slider
slider@yosemite.net

Go to the contents table

1. Origami From Angelfish to Zen, Peter Engel

# of recommendations: 24
Intermediate to Complex.
Published by Dover Publications, September 1, 1994.
ISBN 0-486-28138-8.
(Originally published as "Folding the Universe", ISBN 0-394-75751-3.
Published by Vintage Books.)

.............................
"The best text on design so far, along with some TOO complex models."
-- Goran Konjevod

.............................
"A must have for its discussion of history and evolution of origami. Distinctive models include: hummingbird, giraffe, valentine heart, centipede, knight on horseback and an astou ...

....................
"Especially the discussion in the front of the book."
-- Marsha DuPre (29 Feb 1996)

.............................
"There are about 25 folds presented, including three money folds. The big difference about this book, is that he spends the first 80 pages or so discussing the theory of origami and its relation to Escher, Mandelbrot, Yoshizawa, geometry, mathematics, music, fractals, architecture, art, and yes, even zen. What I've read is a very well thought-out discussion which does nothing to detract from the beauty and creativity of origami. He has managed to examine the bird without killing its song. In addition, the origami literature is very well researched with a large bibliography....As for the folds, he shows some very simple ones in his discussion of the regularity of origami bases (he shows how the kite base, the fish base, the bird base, and the frog base embody 2, 4, 8, and 16 repetitions of the same pattern respectively. Fold them and unfold them and look at the patterns of triangles). Once he gets into his original models, things can get very complex. On many of the models he recommends using an 18" square piece of paper for your first attempt, and this looks like pretty good advice. Does anyone know where to find 18" erasable bond?"
-- Brad Blumenthal (June '89)

............................
"_Folding the Universe_ illustrates models with (currently) unorthodox folding methods. This is not your typical bird base book. The 24 models are life-like in their appearance and porportions. They are not easy! It will probaly take many attempts before most the models are successfully completed. Don't let this discourage you. After all, Peter Engle did the hard part.
Like most human endevours (origami included), advancement is made by amalgamating the methods of others, in turn creating new methods. _Folding the Universe_ excemplfies this process.
I give _Folding the Universe_ by Peter Engle five out of five origami c

...........................
"My first origami book was Peter Engel's, _Folding the Universe_. That book is fascinating. Even though I was itching to fold the incredible models, the text really held my attention. Now, whenever I feel origami becoming too "mechanical", I read his book or others like Kasahara's. I wish I have the gift for languages and was multi-lingual."
-- Yan K. Lau (Jan '93)

.............................
"Peter Engel's _Folding_the_Universe_ devotes the first half of its length to the history of origami and to the methodology and philosophy used to go beyond the historical limits. This book is a must read. However, if you find it a bit overwhelming (not a math/science person, or whatever), there is a scaled down version that can be found in Discover (June 1988) entitled "Origami: The Mathematician's Art" (pp. 55-61)."
-- Joseph Wu (Jan 20, '94)

.............................
"You must get it if you are interested in tying origami to mathematics, the creative process and metaphysics!"
-- Joseph Wu (Mar 22, '94)

.............................
" Peter Engel's "Folding the Universe" gives a magnificent in depth discussion about the side of Origami we usually don't think about."
-- Kevin Thorne (Nov 7, '94)

.............................
"Whilst not a fan of his finished folds (too mechanical for my tastes) the theory presented is stimulating, original & progressive."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

.............................
"Staying up late reading Peter Engel's _Folding the Universe_ is sometimes not very good for you. You start to think too much in that strange self-similarity-seeking mindset you get while reading Douglas Hofstader's _Godel, Escher, Bach_. %)

.............................
"It contains many beautiful, complex designs. What I found more interesting, though, were the introductory chapters. The title is very descriptive -- in addition to origami, the book deals with such seemin ...
cher, the creative process, Chaos Theory, pattern in nature, musical composition, and many others.
One of the main themes is the relationship between pattern and creation. Engel examines the creative process and shows that it can be divided into three major stages: A pattern generation stage, in which the mind enumerates possible candidates for a solution; a second stage, in which a much smaller subset of those candidates, those most likely to be fruitful, are considered; and, finally, a selection of the best choice.
As an example, Engel considers a chess master. At any stage in the game, there are countless ways to choose a course of play. The master doesn't consider all of them, though. Rather, she focuses on a small set of moves which are reasonable at that point in the game, and finally chooses what she considers to be the best among them.
With this model in mind, Engel examines how he developed his origami creations. By focusing on the patterns of creases evident after unfolding the traditional origami bases, the author discovered that they involved the repetition of a simple unit cell, consisting of three right triangles (two of which are identical -- see Joseph Wu's home page using Netscape 1.1). The Kite base contains two iterations of this cell, while the Fish base has four, the Bird base eight, and the Frog base sixteen. By extending and modifying this progression, Engel was able to create models with great realism and complex structure.
In the course of the discussion, both the history of origami and more recent developments are covered. Engel's account of his visit in Japan with origami sensai Akira Yoshizawa is particularly engaging.
Ah, but you wanted a miniature review, so I'd better quit while I'm ahead. I hope you'll read the book, though. It is truly remarkable."
-- David Eisner (Aug 15, '95)

.............................
"Ditto from me. The folds are complex though. I remember struggling with the wonderful crab but torn paper. Then I went over to a _very_ large square cut from foil gift wrap. I succeeded with that (i.e. the tears were only negligable.) I also managed to fold the famous humming bird but found myself disappointed with the result --- I thought that the final form was a bit too heavy for a humming bird. On the other hand, the fish series at the beginning is about intermediate level and is thought provoking. The fish forms seem at first glance to be variations on a single form, however they are folded rather differently. Highly recommended."
-- Mark Casida (Aug 15, '95)

Go to the contents table

2. Origami for the Connoisseur, Kasahara & Takahama

# of recommendations: 23
Published by Japan Publications.
ISBN 0-870-40670-1
(originally published in Japanese as "Top Origami")

.............................
"Out of print, but worthwhile scouring libraries to find. Quite a bit of modular and geometric origami--such as a bird which can be inflated to form an icosahedron. Featured models from Dave Brill, Peter Engel & John Montroll are also available elsewhere. Masterful models from Toshikazu Kawasaki: fox, rose, vegetables, shells."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"I always go back to it. There are some really great models - like kawasaki's rose, brill's lidded box, and some geometric solids. They are puzzles to be figured out. I always feel great when I solve one for the first time."
-- Peg Barber

.............................
"It has a bit of everything, without models being too simple, THE origami book for anyone except the total beginners."
-- Goran Konjevod

.............................
"Quite simply, there's no other origami book like it! It's full of geometric wonders and leads the reader through real folding *projects*, as opposed to learning how to fold a single model. It's been a very influencial book for me, both as an origamist and as a mathe ...

.............................
"I agree with Bruce's suggestions ("Origami for the Connoisseur" and "Origami Omnibus") as good general books, though. They both have a good mix of subjects and skill levels (though I'd say that the first tends more towards complex folds, which the second has some easier models as well as some complex ones.)"
-- Anne LaVin (Jan 19, '94)

..........................
"....it's interesting, but the design advice seems geared towards geometric models, (which occupy the first half of the book anyway). The iso-area folding though is well cool. "
-- Brian Ewins (Jan 20 '94)

.............................
"This is a great book with a nice mix of commentary, folds, and even some theory. The folds range from fairly easy (not quite beginner level) to pretty difficult. Most of the folds produce *very* nice artifacts. There is also some discussion of how to divide paper into various odd numbers of equal sizes and some theory as to why it works. There is a mention of Kawasaki's theorem (did I get that right?) which relates angles of folds to number of resulting points. Folds include a number of solid geometric shapes, seashells, flowers, dinosaurs, boxes, etc. There is also a section on modules."
-- Brad Blumenthal (May 23 1988)

.............................
"This is a great book - half geometric figures, half animal and other "living" figures, intermediate to complex. (I like the rose! It may not have any counterpart in nature - 4 petal frame as opposed to 3 or 5, but it is quite impressive.)"
-- Elsa Chen (Feb 4, 92)

..............................
"The only bug in this book is a ground beetle by John Montroll (as well as his stegasaurus :)! I mention it because (1) it's an A #1 awesome book and (2) Kasahara writes that by "studying" John's beetle, you can create other beetles of your our. As an example he shows a picture of a stag beetle which he made by "modifying" John's ground beetle (no instructs right! If you do unfold the ground beetle, you can open up the head and produce this stag beetle. I managed to do this after an hour or so of studying the model, and highly encourage everyone to try it! This is how you learn to create complex-level folds."
-- Tom Hull (Jan. 26, '94)

.............................
"It has many interesting little things, and lots of mathematical theory...."
-- ORIGAMI (Jul 20, '94)

.............................
(As a recommendation for anything by Kasahara) "His own work is wonderful, plus he exposes other folders with a rare lack of selfishness."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

.............................
"A fantastic variety of folds."
-- John Marcolina (Apr '28, '95)

Go to the contents table

3. Origami Sea Life, Robert Lang and John Montroll

# of recomendations 18
Intermediate to Complex.
Published by Dover Publications, July 1991.
ISBN 0-486-26765-2.

............................
"Simply brilliant. Very unusual and detailed models that you can't find elsewhere: fish in all shapes and sizes, plus shells and crustaceans. Perfect for fans of foil-paper and for making mobiles."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"Probably the best topical book so far, contains some of the best models of both authors."
-- Goran Konjevod

.............................
"My favorite models are those folded from a single square and yet yield apparently complex end results (any of Montroll's advanced Sea Life models for example)."
-- Marc Hache (Mar 8, '94)

.............................
"Oh, and it's well worth the hunting! It's one of my favorites!"
-- Cynthia Pettit (Mar 22, '94

.............................
"Set computer diagrams on the map, plus a huge range of clever techniques for others to adopt. Some unusually beautiful results from two technicians."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28 '95)

..................
... ami heavyweights."
-- John Marcolina (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

4. Origami Boxes, Tomoko Fuse

# of recommendations: 15
Published by Kodansha America Inc, October 1, 1989.
ISBN 0-870-40821-6.
Intermediate.

.............................
"I need to keep Origami Boxes within arms reach all the time although I have memorized the simpler models....I've also had fun with Unit Origami. In recent years my interests have leaned toward the geometric designs over animals and such. Consequently I get a lot of use out of the Fuse books."
-- John Fisher

.............................
"Just boxes, but surprising variations--assembling the units does require some patience. Perfect for your fanciest paper and for presenting small gifts. Squares, hexagons, and octagons. Many of her other books are available in Japanese as well."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"Origami Boxes has got to be the all time great box book - everything is very basic and very learnable!"
-- Dee Lynch

.............................
"I have been folding some boxes out of Tomoko Fuse's book "Origami Boxes". I find that I really must behave and be very precise or the box looks awful.... Perhaps those of you who teach might like to demonstate one of these models? They are not too difficult and are fun to fold, but they do inspire some careful folding."
-- Pat Slider (Dec 30, '95)

.............................
"I have worked with many children as they have progressed from the typical paper cups and pinwheels, etc. - and when they have completed one of these boxes, they have treasured it and been very proud - and promptly ran to show all their friends. Isn't this the same thing we feel when we've mastered the patience and discipline to accomplish more complicated folds? Speaking for myself, Tomoko's boxes are absolutely wonderful and my copy of "Or ...
-- ????? (Jan 1, 1996)

.............................
"In fact, aside from some stuff that I remember from my childhood interest in origami, all I've been doing lately is Fuse boxes. (It was a copy of Origami Boxes that reawakened my interest in Origami."
-- Florrie Brafman (May 9 '95)

.............................
"It's ancient history, now, but I originally subscribed to this list asking for help with directions for the neat little inserts pictured in the octagon box in Tomoko Fuses book "Origami Boxes".
It was a long time ago and I received a few replies of sympathy but nobody seemed able to point me in a useful direction. I've stayed and learned a lot in the meanwhile, and I thank you all very much.
Well, now maybe I can help anyone else who could use this information! I was browsing at the Kinokuniya bookstore in Seattle and found a whole series of Fuse books in Japanese, some on boxes, one of which contains the directions for the inserts! Hurrah! Of course, now I feel I should have been able to figure them out for myself, but my attempts were never so pleasing.
I can't tell the name of the book since I don't know Japanese, but the ISBN is 4-480-87115-2, and I can guess it's number 5 in some series, because the front cover begins with a word and the numeral 5. It has an orange spine. It contains elaborations on the 4- and up sided boxes from the Origami Boxes I have in English. Of course, the price is a little daunting; I keep telling myself it's not paper I'm paying for, it's creativity."
-- Julie (Jan 4, '96)

............................
"I am particularly interested in "practical" or "functional" origami. Can anyone offer ideas for useful designs, either instructions or sources? I have found Tomoko Fuse's book -Origami Boxes- very satisfying in this regard but I am hoping to hear of other ideas that put origami to work."
-- John Fisher (Jan 21, '96)

............................
"Jonathan Poh ask books 'origami boxes' and 'quick and easy boxes." There is some duplication, but every time Fuse does a book, there are some differences, as she's constantly revising and improving. But I'd go with the Origami Boxes and get my paper elsewhere."
-- Valerie Vann (Mar 4, '96)

Go to the contents table

5. Origami Insects and Their Kin, Robert Lang

# of recommendations: 15
Published by Dover Publications, July 1, 1995.
ISBN: 0-486-28602-9.
Complex to more complex.

...........................
"(Evil cackle of glee): Yes, Paul, Origami Insects is 100% complex models, chock-full of closed sinks, edgeless wraps, and other brutally finger-numbing, tendon-popping maneuvers. If you (or anyone else) would like a preview, download the Praying Mantis from the archives -- it's in the book, too! However, the diagrams in Insects should be better and clearer than the ones in Origami Zoo, since I've had a lot more practice diagramming in the intervening years."
-- Robert Lang (Feb 26, '95)

..............................
"First off, I must say any one who thinks Montroll's "Animal Origami for the Enthusiast", should be called "Origami for the Masecist", will no doubt call this book "Origami for the Desperately Suicidal". Every single model is advanced! If you have not mastered Montroll, don't even begin on the models in this book.
Heres an idea! One of the models is a lady bug with spots. Now you may think you will need to dye some black/white paper red to get a really good model. Not so, simply use a piece of paper that is black one side and white on the other. Your torn, abused, frayed, and bleeding fingers will automatically dye the paper red. :->
Sireously though... Normally when I get a new book, I go right to the last model and fold it first. Not this time! No way was I going to tackle that Scorpion right off! So I thumbed thru to see what else would catch my interest. On a resent v ...
ith the Ant's in the Origami exhibit. I was happy to see they were diagramed here in this book. So I started in with a red ten inch square. The only place I had any real troubles was with the middle legs. I'm not sure I folded them right, but they look OK so maybe I did. The finished model looks really great. I'm impressed at how large a model I got, despite the complexity.
Next off I tried the Dragonfly. I used a green paperback foil. I had a bit more trouble on this one, the leading edges of the wings turned out a bit ragged, and the Double Rabbit ear, Sinks, and Reverse folds on the six legs, became pinch and bend. But over all the model looks good. I did make one minor alteration. Instead of folding the eyes up against the head, I simply pulled them out perpendicular to the model, forming a Tee shaped head, much more like a real dragonfly. I also pinched a couple of existing folds to form a nose, not anatomically correct, but cute. One thing I really like about this book is the way repeated step are prominently shown, so you can look ahead and see where you will be repeating steps.
One question though, Robert. In the preface, you state that "Someone, somewhere has folded each of these models". Are we to read this as someone other than yourself. Or are we to assume that in some cases you were working completely in theory, and were greatly releaved when someone else proved that these models were in fact actually foldable in real life. :)"
-- Kim Best (Jul 26, '95)

................................
"He might be refering to me, as well as the other people who tested the models. That's right, I am taking credit for all of the mistakes in the book. For the record, even before I proofed the book,I found all of the models to be quite doable (not to mention excellent and inspiring). Good luck."
-- Marc Kirschenbaum (July 26, '95)

................................
"This book, in my opinion, considerably advances the state of the art in p ...
ise; typographical errors (inevitable in a book with 1879 diagrams) are easily worked around. The photos of his life-sized scale models of his Ant, Treehopper, and others are impressive.
This book is not for the origami beginner; competency, if not fluency, with folding complicated models is a must. Folding these models has been a terrifically frustrating, and rewarding, experience. If you like your origami models complex, this book is a required addition to your library."
-- Tim Rueger (Aug 6, '95....see his entire model-by-model review in the archives!)

.............................
"What a great book!!
I've been holding off on comments about this book until I'd folded a few of the models. I received the book about 3 weeks ago and have been folding obsessively every chance I got since then (I think my wife's starting to get annoyed :-).
So far I've successfully folded the Orb Weaver, Ant, Scarab Beetle, Cicada, Pill Bug, Praying Mantis, Stag Beetle, Samurai Helmet Beetle, and Scorpion, and I'm working on the Hercules Beetle. I also had failed attempts at the Butterfly, Black Pine Sawyer, and Paper Wasp :-(.
I think my favorite model is the Ant; it's so wonderfully 3D, and it's also one of the easiest in the book! Of those I finished, I think the Cicada was the hardest.

All in all, a fabulous book, and one that has already caused me a lot of grief. Robert Lang continues to come up with ever more impossible folds to challenge and punish us (I'll always remember the left-handed behind-the-back in-your-face nothing-to-grab-onto unsink-from-Hell from the Atlantic Purple Sea Urchin :-).
And we keep coming back for more..."
--John Marcolina (Aug 17, '95)

............................
"Thanks for all the nice things you've said about Origami Insects (I consider "I had a wretched time with this model, shredded two reams of paper and ripped out three handfuls of hair before I finished" to fall into that category). In follow-up to J ...
he trouble with step 61 of the Butterfly was caused by not completely doing the "left-handed behind-the-back in-your-face nothing-to-grab-onto unsink-from hell" in steps 45-47, which crawled out of the Sea Urchin and into this model when I wasn't looking.
Incidentally, there's a prize (I haven't figured out what just yet) for the first person to fold a presentable version of the Butterfly where in step 26 you divided each flap into fifths, not thirds; in steps 58-59, the reverse folds go in and out twice, not once (the first set divides the angle into quarters, rather than halves); and each of the leg flaps is narrowed in half once more than in the current version. Any combination of paper and/or tools are allowed. Virtual models are not.
jm> ..if you said what kind of paper you used for your models in the photos and if they were wet-folded...
Here lies a problem: I don't know what kind of paper I used for many of the models. I obtained much of it in the form of various gifts from my Japanese friends (duly noted in the Acknowledgements) so I don't even know what some of it is called.
It's very difficult to give recommendations/instructions for wet-folding beyond suggesting that you try it. I designed all of the models (except the Cicada) first and foremost to be foldable from standard origami paper since that's what everyone has readily available. (The Cicada, the exception, was actually designed to be wet-folded; but I made sure it's still doable with standard origami paper.) If you're folding from kami, things are pretty clear-cut; but if you're going to wet-fold the model, the interplay between the paper (which is constantly changing proportions as its moisture level varies), you, the folder, and the design is a dynamic and personal thing, and there is no way I could supply anything more than a hint as to how to proceed. So the kami-foldable folding sequence is the hint; it's a starting point, but you need to figure out for yourself when to leave the writ wn.
jm> And what in the world do you use when folding from a 1 cm square?
Very, very, VERY thin foil, jeweler's tweezers, and a high tolerance for models pinging across the room when they're halfway done.
jm> And we keep coming back for more...
There's more where that came from!"
-- Robert Lang (Aug 18, '95)

..........................
"The only book I currently have is "Origami Insects and Their Kin" by Lang. It's one of the best books I've seen and if anyone wants to try out some insects, the models are quite difficult but well worth the effort."
-- Ashley G. Perrien (Jan 27, '96)

..........................
"I do hope Mr. Lang will take this as a compliment... Until an "arachnid-free" version of "Origami Insects" is made available, I regret that I will be unable to purchase or even look through a copy of this book! Mr. Lang, that is some incredible folding when just a glimpse of something convincingly arachnid-esque begins to trigger my (occasional) arachniphobiac response mechanism. Even though I know it's just a picture of folded paper, I can't look again.
I've stopped hyperventilating, and my heartbeat is returning to normal. Now I'm just in exhausted awe of such realistic folding skills and photography!
This is one occasion when my vote goes to artistic representation, rather than accuracy. :-)"
-- Jennifer Andre (Feb 20, '96)

..........................
"Incredible models from the master."
-- Charles Knuffke

Go to the contents table

6. Unit Origami, Tomoko Fuse

# of recommendations: 15
Published by Japan Publications, Inc., Dec. 1990.
ISBN 0-870-40852-6
Intermediate.

...........................
"This was my introduction to modular folding. In fact, it is what I got re-started in origami with - (I had folded as a kid, but stopped). I found it truly amazing that I could create these beautiful paper weavings. Fuse de which is the neatest - I love her book called Spirals... I guess I'd choose Unit Origami over most of the rest because it's in English... Folding level easy to intermediate, but some of the assemblies are tricky."
-- Peg Barber

............................
"Has anyone read or purchased _Unit Origami_ by Tomoko Fuse? I have and so far I find it intriguing. The only problem with unit origami that I can see is the time it takes to fold all those little pieces."
-- Eric Lease Morgan (Mar 17, '91)

.............................
"I have and I love it. I've been fascinated with unit origami ever since I discovered the instructions for the simplest pattern in a "Hello Kitty" book (you know, those silly, sappy Japanese "cute" imports). Actually, I don't have much trouble with the amount of time it takes to fold the pieces (certainly no longer than some of the more complicated single sheet folds), although it seems like a long time because it's so repetitious. The part ...
I have the hardest time with is putting everything together at the end. You just get three pieces together and then two fall apart. I especially like working with multicolor models and trying to solve the puzzle of putting it all together without adjacent pieces sharing the same color (sort of like the old 4 color map puzzles).
If else anyone enjoys this type of paper folding (some purist might argue whether it can truly be called Origami), I would highly recommend the book. Lots of interesting models with numerous basic units."
-- Sheila Wassmer (Mar 18, '91)

..............................
"Right now I am having a ball (literally!) with _Unit Origami_ by Tomoko Fuse."
-- Nancy Nietupski (25 Jul 93)

Go to the contents table

7. Viva Origami, Kunihiko Kasahara & Jun Maekawa

# of recommendations: 13
Published by Sanrio, 1983.
ISBN 4-83008-5
Complex.

............................
"Difficult to find and expensive. In Jap ...
s known for creating all sorts of points to his creations. A number of elegant peacock variations. Several challenging masterpieces: his seated deer, lizard, frog, and demon will delight anyone lucky enough to make or receive one."
-- Rob Moes

................................
"There is a series of hardcover books by Kunihiko Kasahara that are fabulous. Viva Origami (in collaboration with Jun Maekawa) has an intricate red devil on the cover - complete with fingers, a tail, wings, ears, and a tongue."
-- VickyAV (Nov 6, '94)

................................
"But the real showcase of Maekawa's work (and only one, as far as I know) is "Viva Origami!" by Kasahara and Maekawa. This book is the one with that INSANE devil in it, and I HIGHLY, HIGHLY recommend this awesome book -- with precautions. Firstly, it's in Japanese, and hasn't been translated as far as I know. Second, many of the folds (including the said devil) skip steps, assuming that you can fill in the gaps. But WAIT, it's not as bad as you think. In fact, I consider the diagrams in this book to be excellent, not knowing Japanese proved not to be a problem, since the pictures were so clear. But it is an ADVANCED book, and very worth the while to work through (the folds, though complex, are all very elegant)."
-- Tom Hull (Jan '93)

................................
"The frustrating thing about Viva Origami, though, is the wonderful write-ups accompanying the models. I do read Japanese, but not well enough to follow most of the text. I wish I could understand all that is being discussed."
-- Sheila Davis (Feb 6, '95)

................................
Don't worry about the book being in Japanese. Viva Origami! is a great book, the diagrams are clear, and the models are pleasantly challenging. I have a soft spot for Kasahara's stuff. His stuff got me started folding when I was a little kid, and I didn't read Japanese then either! (Sti ...
... tarted learning the kana at least, now. So I won't have only the photo of some simple model to go by when trying to tell if it is, say, a roketsu (rocket) or some sort of mushroom - an extremely rare sort of dilemma, granted)"
-- Elsa Chen (Feb 7, '95)

.................................
(As a recommendation for anything by Kasahara)
"His own work is wonderful, plus he exposes other folders with a rare lack of selfishness."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

8. Origami Sculptures, John Montroll

# of recommendations: 12
Published by Dover Publications, February 1, 1991.
ISBN 0-486-26587-0.
High intermediate to complex.

............................
"This has Montroll's insect base, and includes a bol weevle and an asparagus beetle. They're very fresh."
-- Tom Hull (Jan 26, '94)

.......................
"As for favorites, Origami Sculptures was my first "real" book, and still one of my favorites. I definitely like the "3d" models (i.e. ones that stand up rather than lie flat). Origami Sculptures has a very nice camel/dromedary. The face/head is perfect! There's also "Montroll's Dog Base" and "Montroll's Insect Base", which you can use to make lots of different models."
-- Paul Close (Apr 11, '95)

...........................
"I would strongly recommend to people wishing to begin creating new designs that they read through John Montroll's "Origami Sculptures". In that book, Mr. Montroll's dog base is used to create three different dogs, a horse, a bison, a camel and a dromedary (I may be forgetting a few). His insect base is also modified to create two distinct insects. I think examining how he modified these bases to arrive at the different models can be very heuristic for one aspiring to make original designs."
-- Iron Will Dawes (Feb 16, '96)

.......................
"Nice, detailed models, but not as difficult as others, since I folded it straight through with no problems (first time I had done that), but I've been informed that it may not be *quite* that easy. Still, I love it. It also containd the "dog base" which is more accurately a "quadruped base" that, once mastered, gives you a starting point for a lot of mammals: dog (3 in the book), horse, bison, camel, etc.
-- Kevin Kinney

.......................
"about a month ago, I got origami sculptures, and it seems to be pretty good. (the weevil discourages me)"
-- CM (Oct 23, '95)

Go to the contents table

9. Complete Origami, Eric Kenneway

# of recommendations: 10
Published by St Martins Press, 1987.
ISBN 0-312-00898-8.
Simple to intermediate.

................................
"Encyclopedic, describes very simple napkin folds through some advanced techniques, such as Max Hulme's incredible box-pleated Jack in the Box. Many photographs and illustrations: something to tempt everyone."
-- Rob Moes

................................
" Quite simply, there's no other origami book like it! It's an encyclopedia! It covers all types of origami! It's chock full of fun!"
-- Tom Hull (2/26/96)

................................
Another one to read and not only fold from.
-- Goran Konjevod

................................
"I'd just like to add my opinion to this one, I find it very difficult to propomote this one because it's a little to liberal for me. I guess I'm more of a purist than Eric Kenneway is, in that models should be one square uncut sheet of paper. Many of his models require either cuts or start with shapes other than squares (usually rectangles). The book does have some impressive models but the fact that they differ from the norm so greatly is a terrible distraction."
-- Ashley Perrien

................................
"About Andrew Anselmo's question about where to find a reference for action origami (flapping b ...
... my head I can think of a section in Eric Kenneway's book "Complete Origami"."
-- Marco Pavone (Jun 15, '93)

................................
"You might consider acquiring a book called "Complete Origami" by Eric Kenneway. It is an "encyclopedia" of all kinds of origami STUFF, including diagramming, bases and techniques."
-- Tom Stamm (Dec 18, '93)

................................
"I strongly recommend Eric Kenneway's book "Complete Origami" for looking up all these "terms". I find this book quite useful -- sort of an origami encyclopedia with lots of fun diagrams."
-- pat slider (Jan 19, '96)

Go to the contents table

10. Origami Omnibus, Kunihiko Kasahara

# of recomendations 10
Paperback:
Published by Japan Publications, Inc., June 1988.
ISBN: 0-870-40699-X
hardcover:
Published by Japan Publications, Inc., March 1988.
ISBN: 0-870-40696-5

............................
"Out of print, unfortunately. Massive, nearly 400 pages: almost an encyclopedia. Half geometric, half representational. Series of masks, cubes, cranes, polyhedra. Elegant curved fox, llama, panda, dragon, sparrow, Adam & Eve."
-- Rob Moes

..........................
"I agree with Bruce's suggestions ("Origami for the Connoisseur" and "Origami Omnibus") as good general books, though. They both have a good mix of subjects and skill levels (though I'd say that the first tends more towards complex folds, which the second has some easier models as well as some complex ones.)"
-- Anne LaVin (Jan 19, '94)

..........................
"....worth getting, because it has a wide range of quite interesting folds."
-- Bruce Stephens (Jan '93)

.............................
(As a recommendation for anything by Kasahara) "His own work is wonderful, plus he exposes other folders with a rare lack of selfishness."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

11. Origami Zoo, Robert Lang/Stephen Weiss

# of recommendations: 10
Published by St Martins Press, July 1990.
ISBN 0-312-04015-6.
Intermediate to Complex.

............................
"Charming and whimsical beasts of many kinds, including photographs of every model. Delightful and very recognizable models include: scottie dog, roadrunner, skunk, fox, woolly mammoth, bear, eagle, tortoise, praying mantis, and dog in a doghouse. Something to please every folder.
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"This summer I found Origami Zoo on my shelves ( I have no idea what I have :-) and started with the camel. Once I managed step 9...after atleast 1/2 hour things went quite smoothly. That step no longer takes 1/2 hour, I'm happy to say. I seem to enjoy the models in that book as the steps seem to flow very nicely and smoothly from one stage to the next. Whew! Enough for now...actually I was going to tell you which were the difficult steps for me in that camel, but that can be left for another time if you are interested :-)"
-- Sheldon Ackerman (Jul 19, '94)

.............................
"This has a few bugs, namely a grasshopper (different from Montroll's) and a praying mantis (different from the one on the archives). The mantis is made from non-square paper, but it's easier than the one on the archives and I think it looks better. Oh yeah, there's also a horse fly and paper wasp, both which use the white side of the paper for the eyes (very hard, but very good folds. I've actually scared people with these). I think the wasp is from a non-square. Hey, I think there's an ant in this book too, but I might be hallucinating. Check it out."
-- Tom Hull (Jan 26, '94)

.............................
"Lots of great animal folds."
-- John Marcolina (Apr. 28 '95)

Go to the contents table

12. The Complete Book of Origami, Robert Lang

# of recommendations: 9
ISBN 0-486-25837-8.
Intermediate to complex.

.............................
"Almost 50 models, an excellent value, some very difficult. Outstanding bald eagle, elephant, biplane, tarantula. Unique action models: viking ship, three musicians, cuckoo clock."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"If I never buy another origami book, there's still plenty in this book to challenge me."
-- John Marcolina (Apr. 28, '95)

.............................
"Lang's first book. It's good, but many models use non-square paper, and there are a few diagram errors. This is the book with the Tarantula that someone mentioned previously. There may be other bugs, but I don't recall."
-- Tom Hull (Jan 26 '94)

.............................
"....Indeed with the cuckoo clock, marvellous!"
-- Maarten van Gelder (Jan 26, '94)

.............................
">The house of the cuckoo clock...
I am but lately come to this list, but it seems like _everyone_ is talking about this cuckoo clock. Can someone post a reference to it? Is it from a book? None of the ones I've already collected!
The one I'm working on is from Robert Lang's book _The Complete Book of Origami_, a must for any origami library. The clock is three dimensional and although doesn't "work" in the traditional sense, it has a lever that when pulled causes the cuckoo to pop out of the top of the clock. Pretty awesome.
Thanks to Maarten for the estimated dimensions, I'm looking forward to hanging it on the living room wall [if my wife lets me, she's not much of an origami fan :-( ]."
-- Marc Hache (Mar 14, '94)

Go to the contents table

13. Origami Fantasy, Fumiaki Kawahata

# of recommendations: 7
Complex.

.......................
I just got a copy of Fumiaki Kawahata's NEW dinosaur book, "Origami Fantasy," and I gotta tell ya, it's one of the best books to come along in years. This ...
... mbing tendon-popping complex-folding real thing. Front and back covers show wet-folded versions of a T. Rex (with teeth, claws, and toes) and a Stegosaurus, respectively. Color plates inside the front show all of the other models, beautifully wet-folded.

Contents are:
Protoceratops
Apatosaurus
Pteranodon
Triceratops
Tyrannosaurus
Allosaurus
Parasauralophus
Corythosaurus
Lambeosaurus
Maiasaurus
Archeopteryx
Styracosaurus
Dimetrodon
Tuojiangosaurus
Ankylosaurus
Stegosaurus
Unicorn
Pegasus

Obviously, there are a few things other than dinosaurs (therapsids, mythical beings) but it's mostly dinos and they are all STUNNING, if not for the faint of heart. There are more spikes, plates, teeth, horns, claws, and toes than you can shake a stick at, and many of the models run well over 100 steps. All models are folded from one uncut square. The diagrams are clear and sharp but the verbal instructions are in Japanese. Occasionally an English word is thrown in ("Open Sink") for the benefit of his foreign readers. I've folded several of the models and have found no problems. The last few pages describe Kawahata's design approach, some of which he displayed at the Origami Science meeting. Of course, it's all in Japanese as well, but you can get the basic idea from the diagrams, pictures, and mathematical formulas.
If you loved Viva Origami and drooled over Top Origami, you'll go positively ga-ga over Fantasy Origami.
-- Robert Lang (July 23, '95)

.......................
"A couple weeks ago I got a copy of Fumiaki Kawahata's new book, "Origami Fantasy". Try and get it, folks. It's really good. Our esteemed Robert Lang had pumped it up here a few months ago, and the book lives up to it. It's got lots of cool, *hard* models in it. (I love cool, *hard* models.) My favorite ones are his Stegosaurus and his Ankylosaurus.
The Stego is pictured on the back cover of the book; it is remarkably realistic and quite large for a given size of paper. There are *eleven* spikes on the tail, good head detail, and the body is nicely rounded out. A 10-inch square turns into a 5.5-inch long model; quite impressive, given the level of detail in the model.
The Ankylo is a bit harder to picture. It has a finely detailed grid of armor (?) plates, looking like a badger with bathroom tiles glued to its back. This back structure is really neat; I'm not aware of many examples of folding to achieve texturing effect. It, too, is pretty large for a 10-inch square, about 5 inches when finished (some of that is a longish tail). The precreases to achieve the grid are *tedious*; I counted 53 in all.
By and large, the toughest models in this new book aren't quite as hard as the toughest ones in Lang's recent Insects book, but they're definitely not for the faint of heart.
The book is definitely worth seeking out."
-- Tim Rueger (Nov. 15, '95)

............................
"New Japanese book, very costly -- for devotees of dinosaurs and fantasticall y complex models. Over 150 steps for the fearsome Tyrannosaurus, and astoundingly spiky Tuojiangosaurus. Unique folding methods as in Dimetrodon, to delight even the most savvy folder. Almost painstaking in detail, as with Unicorn and Pegasus, the two non-dinosaurs."
-- Rob Moes

Go to the contents table

14. Brilliant Origami, David Brill

# of recommendations: 6
Published by Japan Publications, Inc., February 1, 1996.
ISBN: 0-870-40896-8.
Intermediate to complex.

............................
"Brand new and truly brilliant -- encompasses over 20 years of his work, well-known models from the British Origami Society. Elegant 3-dimensional animals for wet-folding: fox-hunt scene with horse, rider, hounds & fox is breathtaking. Human models (some compound) which are rarely attempted: three wise men, Hallowe'en witch, Christmas-tree fairy, St. George (slaying dragon)."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"BTW, his boo ...
... ication by a Japanese company. I've seen the material & it is WONDERFUL. For me, Dave represents the perfect marriage of technique allied to (but never dominating) artistry."
-- Nick Robinson (Jul. 18, '95)

.............................
"I have to tell you that I haven't folded much from this book yet. I just got my copy a couple of days ago. So I can't give you great detail about the quality of the diagrams, ease of folding, etc. But Dave Brill's models are wonderful, as you will see from the color illustrations, and the diagrams seem clear. They are hand-drawn, not computer-drawn, so they have an appealing (to me, at least) rough character about them.
I did not have any problems with the few things I've folded so far, so I assume the rest of them are OK, too. Most of the geometrics are from A4 based paper, and there is a handy page of explanations, sizes, and ways to get A4 from other shapes. Most of the other models are from square based paper (i.e., square, triangle, 2 x 1). There are some interesting helpful hints, suggestions, and discussion about the models. They are not rated for complexity, but I'd grade them from Intermediate to Complex.
The book is divided into several sections. Here are some of the 79 models in the 240-page book:
Toys and Working Models, including Exhibitionist (not anatomically correct), Spectacles and Nut and Bolt
Boxes and Containers, including Gift Box, Bottle, Yacht, Box and Lid, Cigarette Packet and Matchbox
Modular Origami, including Sunken Silver Cube, Stellated Dodecahedron and Double Star Flexicube
Animals, including Goose, Foxhound, Horseman, Rhinoceros, Lion, Horse and Dragon
Human Figures, including Christmas Tree Fairy, Father Christmas, Three Wise Men, Show Jumper, St. George, Geppetto and Pinocchio Groups and Scenes, including Ashtray, Reindeer and Square Silver Star
I hope this helps. If anyone else has seen the book, perhaps they can add more."
-- Jan Polish (Feb 15, '96)

...........................
... re (large or small), and get this book! At $20, it's a steal. Now for a mini review - please realize I haven't done any "new" ones yet in it, I can just tell you (some of) what's in it. ...
... the "Flasher", the ***Nut & Bolt*** (for those few of us who don't happen to have der falter #8), his bottle, box w/lid, working matchbox, an amazing one-piece pack of cigarettes, a money box (pushka), books, a large selection of cool modular origami, animals including squirrel, goose, fox, foxhound, a great rhinoceros and elephant, lion cub, dragon w/flapping wings and from triangles, his horse, lion, and lioness. Then he's got a whole slew of human figures, including a great 3-piece witch, santa with reindeer and sleigh, wise men, etc.
The book is very well presented, with with beautiful color photos in the front of the book."
-- Yaacov (Feb '16, '96)

.............................
"....is a pretty neat book; I highly recommend it."
-- Jason L. Tibbitts III (Mar 3, '96)

Go to the contents table

15. Origami Animals, Robert Lang

# of recommendations: 6
Published by Crescent Books, December 1, 1992.
ISBN: 0-517-07320-X
Simple to complex.

............................
"Best introduction on "how to fold" and diagrams symbols that I have seen yet. The diagrams are so clear that I think the careful beginner can even fold the high-intermediate models."
-- Pat Slider

.............................
"... and there is a really cool whale!!"
-- Dee Lynch

.............................
"Beautiful book!"
-- Don Shall (May 30 '95)

Go to the contents table

16. Origami For The Enthusiast, John Montroll

# of recommendations: 6
Published by Dover Publications, March 1, 1985.
ISBN 0-486-23799-0.
Complex.

............................
"25 models all with completed photos. Very pleasing to fold, including walrus, brontosaurus, frog with toes, antelope, a now in Origami Sea Life."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"My first Montroll book, and my favorite."
-- Charles Knuffke

.............................
"Montroll has some of the most unbelievable folds I've ever come up against. Whenever I do something of his, I constantly ask myself, "*Where* did he come up with *this* one?" Once you get the hang of them they're not that hard, but they still amaze me. This is a book of strictly folds at the intermediate to advanceed level and includes several examples of fish, birds, mammals, rodents, and bugs (always dear to computer scientists. For luck, I have several bugs guarding my computers, and an elephant guarding the SCSI connector on my hard disk :-). It also has a pegasus fold."
-- Brad Blumenthal (May 23, 1988)

.............................
"....just wanted to say that your book Origami for the Enthusiast gave me many many hours of pleasure, and is the best book on Origami that I've ever read."
-- Lewis Stiller (Oct '90)

.............................
"John's first book. It's awesome. Buy it. Contains a moth, stink bug, a wonderful grasshopper, and one or two others that I can't remember."
-- Tom Hull (Jan 26 '94)

Go to the contents table

17. The Art of Origami, Gay Merrill Gross

# of recommendations: 5
Paperback published as "The Origami Workshop"
Published by Friedman/Fairfax Pub
Publication date: April 1, 1995
ISBN: 1-567-99148-3
Simple to intermediate.
(Originally published as "The Art of Origami")

............................
"Clever modular paper ideas -- jack-in-the-box, butterfly ball which flies apart, brilliant magic star which converts from a ring to a star. Carefully collected models, both old and new, from around the world. Another book which utilizes decorative paper well."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"Beautiful book"
-- Janet Hamilton (April 27, 1995)

Go to the contents table

18. Essential Origami,Steve and Megumi Biddle

# of recommendations: 5
Published by St Martins Press. June 1, 1991.
ISBN 0312057164.

.............................
"Good for beginners."
-- Marsha DuPre (29 Feb 1996)

.............................
"Mostly because of the clear directions for beginners."
-- Terry Hall

.............................
"There are other books, of course, but these two are designed to teach the basics and to take a novice folder to a higher level of folding. Diagrams are clear and there is a great deal of explanation."
-- Joseph Wu (Feb 10, '94)

Go to the contents table

19. Mythical Beings, Jay Ansill

# of recomendations: 5
Published by HarperPerennial, 1992.
ISBN 0-060-96866-4.
Intermediate to complex.

.............................
"I though the photos were great, but the diagrams were small and hard to read and were also missing some of the step by step instructions."
-- Charles Knuffke

.............................
"I have the book and have done some of the models. Some are hard to follow, but it's generally a fun book! I've memorized the winged dragon because it's a rather simple model [and fun to make out of peppermint patty papers in pizza restaurants!]. The pegasis must be made out of one-color paper [ie the paper has to be the same color on both sides... :( ]. The elf is fairly easy and a friend of mine gave up on the Daedalus, but I plodded on and finished it."
-- Cynthia Pettit (Jan '93)

.............................
"Books 1 and 2 of the Origami Today series, edited by Jay Ansill of "Origami" CD fame, are out. Book 1 is devoted to mythical beings and has intermediate to complex folds by Lang and other experts...Cerberus, the 3-headed dog (NOT Cerebus the Aardvark!), lord Shiva of the many arms, (based on the praying mantis), Daedalus, various dragons...about 14-15 figures in all. *****Highly recomme ...

Go to the contents table

20. Origami, Plain and Simple, Robert Neale & Tom Hull

# of recommendations: 5
Published by St Martins Press, April 1, 1994
ISBN 0-312-10516-9.

.............................
"OK. I wrote it. But I can still vote for it, can't I? I still think it's one of the best beginner's books out there."
-- Tom Hull

.........................
"The models in the book are (hold on - I'm doing this from memory) Simple Folds: Frog with a Big Mouth, Owl and Owlet, Holy Shield, Abstract Elephant, Scotty Dog, Simple Wallet Action Folds: Talking Bird, Funky Swan, Cobra (it strikes!), "Kiss Me", Greeting Card, Raven Mask, Throwing Dart Modular Folds: Pinwheel-Ring-Pinwheel (the same one as in _The Magic of Origami_), Ornamental Thingie, Sunburst, Stabile, Squared Square & Cube, Three Wise Men, Sea Serpent, Chess Set Frog Pond: Frog Head with a Big Mouth, Frog with a Big Mouth in Flight, Frog with a Big Mouth, Tounge, and Eyes. Getting Tricky: Elephant I, Angel Fish, His Lady's Voice (a dog), Bald Eagle, Rabbit, Tesselating Fish, Elephant II
Oh yeah! I forgot to mention the SImple Fish in the Simple Folds chapter! That's it (unless I forgot any).
All models are new and never-before published (except the Pinwheel-ring, and the Scotty Dog appeared in a Friends Annual Collection a while back)."
-- Tom Hull (Apr 4, '94)

.............................
"The book contains 32 models, and is way-simple to solid-intermediate level. The book has 5 chapters:

All models are the creations of Robert Neale. I'm responsible for the diagrams, writing, and bizzarre humor. I hope some of you will get a kick out of it."
-- Tom Hull (Apr 4, '94)

..............................
"I got a quick look at your new book today and it looks great! I will pick it up and take it home next pay ...
... ts are quite unique.
I didn't mention the other day (because of my computer problem) that I was pleasantly surprised at your simple frog. I followed the written directions quite easily and it gave me a good laugh when I finished it. He is one of my favorite frogs!
I am not one of those folks who love to fold the altra-technical type models. I will do it, but i can't say I derive a lot of joy from it. So when I come across a simple but elegant model, they are like wonderful gifts."
-- Nancy Nietupski (Apr 5, '94)

...........................
"Tom's book is super! The diagrams are easy, the models are nice, and there is a creative little story showing all the models. Well done!"
-- Linda Casey (Apr 5, '94)

...........................
""Origami Plain and Simple" has clever and fun models, easy to understand instructions, and clear layout and format. It has things to make which are easy and enjoyable -- I'd recommend it highly!"
-- Agnes Tomorrow (June 2, '94)

...........................
"Generally, I don't bother with books that are full of simple models, but Bob Neale/Tom Hull's book _Origami: Plain and Simple_ is a great one, and far more apt to catch a neophyte folder's attention than any other I've seen -- the models are all original (instead of the constantly rehashed "Flapping Bird, Inflatable Frog" motif), the diagrams are clean, and the layout highly enjoyable. I always recommend this one when someone asks about beginner's books."
-- Judd Harris (Apr 30, '95)

...........................
"Well, I don't know about any records for the height or distance of the jumping frog models, but the ones I make leap a pretty impressive distance. The are from the book: _Origami, Plain and Simple_"
-- ??? (Dec 9, '95)

Go to the contents table

21. Prehistoric Origami, John Montroll

# of recommendation
1, 1991.
ISBN: 0-486-26588-9
Intermediate to complex.

.............................
"...wonderful because the models look so realistic. They're hard, but not impossible."
-- Peg Barber

.............................
"I love dinosaurs!"
-- John Marcolina (Apr. 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

22. Creative Origami, Kunihiko Kasahara

# of recommendations: 4
Published by Kodansha America Inc.
ISBN 0-870-40411-3.

.............................
"The book that got me started on creating was Kasahara's _Creative_Origami_. He's got a chapter at the end of the book devoted to the process of creating ("The Thrill of Creating")."
-- Joseph Wu (Jan 20, '94)

.............................
(As a recommendation for anything by Kasahara) "His own work is wonderful, plus he exposes other folders with a rare lack of selfishness."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

23. The Magic of Origami, Alice Gray and Kunihiko Kasahara

# of recommendations: 4
Published by Japan Publications, December 1, 1985.
ISBN 0-870-40624-8.
Simple to intermediate.

.............................
"Maybe I should explain that I am never around experienced folders (except at the convention) so I am always asked for books for beginners. These two are the best I know. Sakata is best for rank beginners because of the exceptional clarity of the photo-illustrations. Gray/Kasahara is better for those who want a bit more challenge and/or more information. Given my "audience" a Montroll would be a disaster!"
-- Carol Hall

.............................
"Great for holiday folding. I think there is probably something in that book for every holiday plus some!! I get a lot out of it for teaching classes. Nothing is too complex, and it is ultimately a book that I go to when I want to learn something "by heart"
-- Dee Lynch

.............................
(As a recommendation for anything by Kasahara) "His own work is wonderful, plus he exposes other folders with a rare lack of selfishness."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28

Go to the contents table

24. Secrets of Origami, Robert Harbin

# of recommendations: 4
Published by Hamlyn, 1974.
ISBN 7-064-0088-7
intermediate to complex.

.............................
"Classic, very large collection of models. As in the Randlett book, very distinctive works: birds by Montoya, Rohm's see-saw, Cerceda's peacock, Elias' Dove Cote. Mostly adapted from traditional bases, good for folders working toward more advanced levels."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"This is out of print too, I think."
-- Marsha DuPre (29 Feb 1996)

.............................
"My first origami book (and only up to about a week ago) is "Secrets of Origami: The Japanese art of paper folding" by Robert Harbin. I find it to be a phenomenal book with around 125 pieces in it (some I still can't do to this day). The book features folders such as Florence Temko, Robert Harbin, Ligia Montoya, John M. Nordquist, Jack J. Skillman, Adolfo Cerceda, Neal Elias, Fred Rohm, Robert Neale, and George Rhoads. The level of difficult ranges from beginners to difficult. Unfortunately, I have never seen this book any- where. Which is unfortunate, because my copy is really beat up."
-- John Morin (April '92)

Go to the contents table

25. Sosaku Origami, Akira Yoshizawa

# of recommendations: 4
Intermediate to complex.

.............................
"In particular, I recommend anything by yoshizawa that you can get your hands on. His models are not, generally, complex, but really make you think about the creature you're trying to represent. The models frequently take several tries to get right, as they are always very sensitive to the angles you choose, and rarely have distinct landmarks. But they're incredibly rewarding!"
-- Anne LaVin, Jan 19 '94

.............................
"...a beautiful hardback with a ribbon :->. I do think this book has a high percentage of wowable models!

.............................
"....Lots of variations with subtle differences in the finishing details -- very interesting. I guess I would call this intermediate to high-intermediate. I've pointed out a couple of complex models.
Hardback in Japanese (which I do not read). Over 70 models, 158 pages (43 pages are color photographs of finished models in gorgeous elaborate scenes, not all of which are diagrammed, unfortunately! Example 11 dog-breed variations. Some are in his other books, but the more elaborate ones are not...)
Begins with bird-base and bird-base variations (square, rhombus, equilateral triangle, and right angle triangle) with examples of birds. Simple leaves & flowers: tulip stem, simple leaf variations, cherry blossom, bamboo leaf, water lily & blossom, 16-petal sunflower, rose hip, and others.
Insects & plants: 2 nice butterfly variations, onion/fig (?), simple cicada, carrot, mushroom, jumping frog, simple beetles, dragonfly. Aquatic life: Fish base & fish variations, sea horse, dolphin-fish variation (the one with many tiny crimps is very attractive), flying fish, intricate squid (not quite as difficult as Engel's), complex crab (blintz frog base), pretty fish with fins.
Birds: baby & adult penguin, baby & adult swan, chicken, long-tail pheasant, 2 more pheasant variations (one simple, one detailed -- very pretty!), chicks, simple sparrow, baby & adult owl, two bat variations. My vote for the best section in the book.
Animals: 3 rabbit variations, squirrel, two-piece husky dog (2 variations) with pups (2 variations), setter, two-piece panda, simple water buffalo, mouse, simple boar (?), 2 horse variations, 2 fox variations out of a long rectangle (many poses!), a couple of very good 2-piece bird base models -- camel and monkey, tiger, dragon, snake.
Heavenly bodies, objects, people: constellations, 4-point & 5-point (clever, out of a bird-base) stars, flying seed, hang-glider (from BOS #100 issue), glider, pleated lampshades, man in winter, (?story), simple angel, simple nun, human faces.
Clearly the idea is to stimulate the reader to come up with his/her own ideas for poses, finishing details, etc. If I remember right *sosaku* means creative....
I have two other yoshizawa books, and this is my personal favorite. The others are probably out-of-print but keep an eye open! Origami Museum Animals I, in English 0-87040-737-6 (Japanese title is Origami Hakubutsushi I; there's also II) and Tanoshii (Joyful) Origami, 4-308-00091-2. Hope this helps somebody!"
-- Rob Moes, April 17, '96

.............................
"I too enjoy the book, but I'd have to disagree that this book is really high-intermediate to complex in status; I'd place it right at the intermediate level, with the single exception of the "Crab" on pp. 72-3 which is probably accurately placed as high intermediate. It's a beautiful book, and I like all the models in it, although I rarely fold them. One thing I do use the book for is this: there is a two-piece, compound "Camel" on pp. 110-111 which is composed of two bird bases. For folders under my tutelage who are eager to advance, I like to challenge them to take what they know of the capability of blintzing and try to make the same camel from a single sheet of paper. (It's difficult to do exactly, but even a rough approximation is not difficult to achieve). Does anyone else do this kind of thing?"
-- Jerry Harris, April 18, '96

Go to the contents table

26. "Amazing Origami for Children", by Steve and Megumi Biddle.

# of recommendations: 3
Published by Trafalgar Square.
ISBN 0-091-77405-5.
Simple.

.............................
"Great stuff! All of it is easy and there is some cool stuff like finger puppets and toys and cars and shows you how to make greeting cards and all kinds of things! If you ever see it, I would heartily reccommend it!
-- Dee Lynch

.............................
"I recently checked out AMAZING ORIGAMI F ...
... ought the diagrams were very clear and the models were fun. It ranges from very simple to not quite so simple modulars."
-- Kelly Reed (June 2, '94)

Go to the contents table

27. The Complete Origami Course, Paul Jackson

# of recommendations: 3

.............................
"I think this is out of print."
-- Marsha DuPre (29 Feb 1996)

.............................
"There are other books, of course, but these two are designed to teach the basics and to take a novice folder to a higher level of folding. Diagrams are clear and there is a great deal of explanation."
-- Joseph Wu (Feb 10, '94)

Go to the contents table

28. Creative Life with Origami III - Takahama

# of recommendations: 3
simple to complex

.............................
"The "Creative..." book is outstanding. It's as diversified an origami book as you'll ever find; models include Chinese zodiac, flowers, mosaic tile patterns, dogs, cats and a really cool frill-necked lizard. If you or someone you know can read Japanese, the textual content is also excellent. Each model has a small description (not nearly, in my opinion, as enjoyable and informative as Mr. Montroll's or Mr. Lang's). There is also a very brief section on the Chinese zodiac and on ikebana (flower arranging). There are several different types (sorry, but I don't know flower phylogeny) of flowers presented, all of which are very real-looking."
-- Iron Will Dawes (Sept. 26, '95)

.............................
"A beautiful book! Some flowers, but a large variety of other models. Don't buy it if all you want is flowers, but a worthwhile book for a budding intermediate folder."
-- Janet Hamilton (Sept. 26, '95)

Go to the contents table

29. Exotic Paper Airplanes, Thay Yang

# of recommendations: 3
Intermediate to high intermediate.

.............................
"A much better airplane book with similar models (i.e. fighter jets, etc) created with a different folding method is _Exotic_Paper_Airplanes_ by Thay Yang....The cover price is $9.99. Yang is not a paperfolder, so his diagramming is slightly unorthodox, but it is clear and concise and understandable. It seems a shame that a non-folder would do a better job than a folder."
-- Joseph Wu (Aug 15, '94)

.............................
"Maybe not the easiest paper airplanes to trim and fly well, but definitely some of the best looking. Some interesting techniques/ideas for planes."
-- pat slider

Go to the contents table

30. New Ideas for Paperfolding, Gay Merrill Gross

# of recommendations: 3
Published by WORLD PUBNS
Publication date: August 1990
ISBN: 0-792-45253-4
(Paperback published as "Creative Ideas for Paperfolding")
Published by Friedman/Fairfax Pub, May 1994.
ISBN: 1-567-99068-1)

.............................
"....Although this book is not very big. (Nor was it very expensive, a mere $10.) I have enjoyed it. It too has many "practical folds", models that are not as artistic as "traditional" origami, but it is just as facinating."
-- Eric Lease Morgan (Mar '91)

Go to the contents table

31. The New Origami, Steve Biddle

# of recommendations: 3
Published by St Martins Press, December 1, 1993.
ISBN 0-312-08037-9.
Simple to complex.

Go to the contents table

32. Origami Flowers, Toshie Takahama

# of recommendations: 3
published by Yuki Shobo, Tokyo, 1973"
intermediate to complex

.............................
"I have a book in my collection that I am not sure of the title and author of (it is all in Japanese), but I believe it is the book you list above. It is my favorite flower book because it has a wide ...
... e leaves to match. A warning to purists - some use odd shaped paper (triangular, hexagonal, etc)."
-- Janet Hamilton (Sept. 26, 1995)

.............................
"Toshie Takahama's Hana no Origami is probably the most complete book devoted to folding a variety of flowers. She shows two methods of treating the stem -- twisting narrow strips of paper, which the Japanese are used to doing, and using floral tape to attach flowers and leaves to it. The other method which is commonly used is to treat origami flowers as one would artificial flowers and use a floral wire as the base of the stem and wrap floral tape to secure the flower and leaves to the wire and also to wrap the wire to give it the proper body and color. Sometimes a variety of boxes and bowls are used to hold the flowers."
-- James Sakoda (Jan. 16, '96)

Go to the contents table

33. Origami Made Easy, Kunihiko Kasahara

# of recommendations: 3
Published by Japan Publications, September 1, 1979.
ISBN 0870402536.
Simple to intermediate.

"A variety of surprisingly sophisticated-looking models in a rather unassuming, simple book. Utilizes many effective two-piece models, such as kangaroo, shark, and astronaut. Especially good for beginning adults who will appreciate the attention to detail."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"Another book I go to to find material that isn't too difficult to teach other people. Not to say there isn't some in there that's complex, but I find Kasahara easy to follow for the most part, so I also like "Origami for the Connoisseur" - it has harder material in it though. I don't think I have ever used it for a "general" class. I have taught things out of it for my origami club - and actually, I DID teach Kawasaki's "Space Shuttle" at a Star Trek convention once - but it may have been a little difficult for beginners!"
-- Dee Lynch

..........................
"His own work is wonderful, plus he exposes other folders with a rare lack of selfishness."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

34. Paper Airplanes, Nick Robinson

# of recommendations: 3

.............................
"Had to really, since I'm very proud of it. Well & truly stiffed by the publishers. My first (& probably last) book, available in remainder shops the world over &:)"
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

.............................
"I most whole heartedly recommend Nick Robinson's fine book "Paper Airplanes" for models which are both excellent origami and beautiful flyers."
-- Steve Buck (Nov 24, '95)

.............................
"The most thumbed book on my shelf...and my five-year-old's favorite. A nice variety of models with good tips on how to fly them."
-- Pat Slider

Go to the contents table

35. The World of Origami, by Isao Honda

# of recommendations: 3
Published by Japan Publications, June 1, 1979.
ISBN: 0-870-40383-4
Intermediate to complex.

.............................
"I've misplaced my Honda but, since it was the book that got me started, I have to rank it quite high."
-- John Fisher

.............................
"Classic from the 1960's, specializes in two-piece compound models, most from traditional bases, some with a minimum of cutting. Another good value -- over 100 models to try."
-- Rob Moes

Go to the contents table

36. "3D Geometric Origami: Modular Polyhedra", Rona Gurkewitz and Bennett Arnstein.

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Dover Publications, February 1 1996.
ISBN 0-486-28863-3.

.............................
"Everyone who sees it says it's beautiful."
-- Rona Gurkewitz

.............................
"I have just gotten this book by Rona Gurkewitz and Bennett Arnstein,... and by the authors. The directions appear clear and it seems to provide pointers so you can understand what is required to construct the models."
-- Jeanine Meyer (April 3, 1996)

Go to the contents table

37. "African Animals in Origami", John Montroll

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Dover Publications, September 1, 1991.
ISBN 0-486-26977-9.

Go to the contents table

38. Creating Origami, J.C. Nolan

# of recommendations: 2
Intermediate to Complex.

.............................
"Although I've not created models as an adult (I did as a kid but can't remember any of them) I found this book to be immensely encouraging on that score. The models are fun, although some are quite hard to fold."
-- Peg Barber

.............................
"Very Interesting models, but the descriptions of how Origami models were created is what makes this a fabulous book. If I ever taught a class on Origami, this would be the text!"
-- Charles Knuffke

Go to the contents table

39. Decoration Boxes, Tomoko Fuse

# of recommendations: 2

.............................
"I have a Japanese Fuse book "Decoration Boxes" I think is the name... not as easy, but really interesting - all of the pieces are folded the same... it gives you a preliminary base on the top, which you can then make a strawberry, seal, sea shell, and about a dozen other things... a lot of fun mixing and matching!"
-- Dee Lynch

.............................
"It is in Japanese... but the diagrams are pretty well done. It just takes some getting used to. It helps that there is a section describing the folds... It is interesting too, you tend to pick up on things, like "Page 8"..."
-- Dee Lynch (Apr 14, '95)

Go to the contents table

40. "Easy Origami", John Montroll

ISBN: 0-486-27298-2
Simple.

.............................
"Great to teach from."
-- Janet Hamilton (April 27, 1995)

Go to the contents table

41. Easy Origami: Step by Step Projects That Teach Across the Curriculum, by Gay Merrill Gross and T

# of recommendations: 1
ISBN 0-590-53549-8.
Simple

.............................
"Just got a copy of a new book by Gay Merrill Gross and Tina Weintraub called "Easy Origami: Step by step projects that teach across the curriculum". It is rated as for grades 2-6. I think that this is an outstanding book for teachers and for people who teach origami to groups of children. This book fills a void in that it spells out lots of good and specific ideas on how to use origami models in the classroom and is more than a book of models.
The book differs from Gross' previous books in that the cover is in color but the book is black and white. Yet it is presented very attractively. The diagrams and directions are very clear. The models selected are mostly traditional and mostly simple except for the balloon and the crane. Each set of diagrams is followed by a section on curriculum ideas in such areas as science, language arts, math and social skills. These ideas are specific and imaginative. There is also a whole section of the book devoted to different methods of teaching origami, such as teaching a core group of five and let each of them in turn teach another group. There is also a brief history of origami, the story of Sadako and the 1000 cranes and a section on suggested language for describing origami folds.
This book is aimed at the teacher new to origami, but contains a lot of material useful for someone who wants to reach young children."
-- Rona Gurkewitz (Jan 11, '96)

Go to the contents table

42. An Encyclopedia of Origami and Papercraft Technique

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Running Press. September 1991.
ISBN 1-561-38063-6.

.............................
"I happen to think that this is a wonderful book; that something of its kind is long overdue. Let me explain...
The first thing that should be pointed out is that this is NOT a standard origami book. The title suggests that this is an encyclopedia, rather than a volume of folds for you to do. In fact, there are only 3 or 4 folds in the whole book! My point is that this bopo (sorry) book shouldn't be judged on the same grounds as other origami books. To crticise the book for having pictures of folds without instructions as to how to do them is quite silly. Why? Because Jackson's purpose in the book is to 1) provide an overview of the types of sculpture techniques that can be achieved with just paper and 2) showcase some of the fascinating artwork that is being done with the paper medium. Point 1) is met with chapters on how to fold paper, how to do paper mache, how to construct pop-up designs, and such. Point 2) is met with chapters of pictures (each described in detail) of recent paper artwork, a good portion of which is origami. Various David Brill folds and some amazing stuff by Akira Yoshizawa (who achieves a softness and realism that has to be seen to be believed) are shown, as well as some of Fujimoto's "crystallagraphic flat origami" stuff and some other paperfolders whom I never heard of before!
It is this showcase portion of the book that I find so intriguing. The distinction between origami as a craft/puzzle and origami as sculpture is one that has interested me greatly (and is something we could debate about here for quite a while, I'm sure). To finally see ways in which sculptists have incorporated origami into their work is a great joy! It exposes one to greater possibilities of the art.
In this light, of course not everything in the book is going to be diagrammed. Most of the models are in fact are produced after painting/tex fects the final "look" of the piece.
Trying to reproduce all this in diagrams would be silly. Of course, some wild technical challenges can be seen by studying the pictures, and most of these folds can be worked out if you hammer at it long enough (Paul Jackson's "Buldge", for example, is a fun little exercise). But clearly Paul Jackson was not intending this to be another book of folds. Rather, he wanted to communicate to the world what was happening in the papercraft/paperfolding scene , which could end up drawing more people to origami than any straightforward origami book would!"
-- Tom Hull (Jan '93)

.............................
"The "Encyclopedia of Papercraft and Origami" (or some similar title) is a very inspiring book."
-- Comet (July '93)

Go to the contents table

43. Japan's Creative Origami, Toyaki Kawkai

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Barnes & Noble, 1983.
ISBN 0-06-464073-6.

.............................
"My first origami book. This is a little pocket book that has both traditional and creative origami. Most of the folds are fairly simple, but some of them are rather challenging, and many of them are either very attractive, very useful (boxes and such), or very traditional (traditional crane, eagle, etc). It's surprisingly good for an introductory book."
-- Brad Blumenthal (May 23, 1988)

.............................
"The book is a bit small, (approx. 4" x 6") but contains many figures in it's 123 pages. Photographs also contrast the creative versus the traditional folding method."
-- Andreas Meyer (20 Mar 92)

Go to the contents table

44. Joy of Origami, Toshie Takahama

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Japan Publications, February 1985.
ISBN: 0-870-40603-5

.............................
"....fairly simple, but has some nice folds in it, and has a nice graphic representation of the relationship between the various bases."
-- Brad Blumenthal (April 1989)

Go to the contents table

45. Making More with Money, OrigamiUSA

# of recommendations: 2

.............................
"The best money book so far."
-- Charles Knuffke

Go to the contents table

46. Modern Origami, James Sakoda

# of recommendations: 2
Simon and Schulster, 1969

.............................
"The book that first showed me what Origami was capable of. A favorite, though presently out print ;-(. "
-- Charles Knuffke

.............................
"I remember going into a store with my mother (I was in elementary school at the time, I think), and I was attracted to the depictions of origami. We ended up getting some paper and an origami book (Sakoda's _Modern Origami_, which I still love best of all; it's yellowed now, and some of the pages are coming out (it was softbound))."
-- arien kismet del'tai (Jul. 14, '94)

Go to the contents table

47. Origami, Paulo Mulatinho

# of recommendations: 2
ISBN 1-856-27689-9.

.............................
"Particularly clear for beginners and it indicates things like paper sizes."
-- MaryRose Hoare

.............................
"Nice selection of easy models."
-- Marsha DuPre (29 Feb 1996)

.............................
(perhaps these reviews are for two different titles???)

Go to the contents table

48. Origami: a Step by Step Guide, Robert Harbin

# of recommendations: 2

.............................
"Incredible inside-out creations by Patricia Crawford --- if only the grand piano were here too..."
-- Goran Konjevod

Go to the contents table

49. Origami, El Mundo Nuevo, Kunihiko Kasahara

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Sanrio.
in Japanese.
(Origami Shinsekai)

Go to the contents table

50. Origami, La Era Nueva, Kunihiko Kasahara

in japanese.
Published by Sanrio.

Go to the contents table

51. Origami: Paperfolding for Fun_ by Eric Kenneway

# of recommendations: 2

.............................
"This book is out of print, and only the first edition has any bugs. I mention it because these bugs (a spider and a fly) really turned me on when I first did them! Look for it in your local libraries. You might get lucky (or snail me something that you like, and I'll send you copies :). They are non-square, but they look SO COOL when you fold them with foil paper that I don't care! These bugs are by Max Hulme."
-- Tom Hull (Jan 26, '94)

Go to the contents table

52. Origami Flower Arrangement, James Sakoda

# of recommendations: 2
Self-published, April '92

.............................
"I must confess that I have desktop publilshed a few hundred copies of a book titled Origami Flower Arrangement, but it is now out of print and awaits my republishing it after making some revisions. In addition to flowers it features stems which are folded from strips of foil paperin triangular tubes, part of which is left open for insertion of short stems holding flowers and leaves. The rest of the stem is folded solid for insertion into a second or third stem. lThe vase is folded from poster boards and has a small hole at the top to hold the stems and grooves along the edges at the bottom to hold the bottom of the stems. The vase was originally square, when seen from the top, but I plan to add pentagon and hexagon shapes. The flower arrangement section discusses traditional Japanese Ikebana techniques for arranging a relatively small number of flowers in a natural appearing form."
-- James Sakoda (Jan. 16, '96)

.............................
"Every model in this book is a gem. According to the preface it's a workbook that was created for a workshop."
-- CThackeray (Mar. 18

Go to the contents table

53. Origami Flowers, Yoshihide Momotani

# of recommendations: 2
(ISBN 4-416-38900-0)

.............................
"Momotani has a Japanese book entitled _Origami_Flowers_ ... which is quite good."
-- Joseph Wu (July 18, 1994)

Go to the contents table

54. Origami Gli Insetti, Alfredo Giunta

# of recommendations: 2
Published by il Castello, 1987.
in Italian.

.............................
"Giunta has a book with diagrams for the models you described. It is _Origami_Gli_Insetti_ (in Italian, no ISBN, available from the Origami Source). There are some nice models, but most of the more complex pieces are folded from long rectangles (for you purists out there). The folding technique "feels" awkward and simplistic, however, and I would recommend that anyone interested in insect forms should wait for Robert J. Lang's upcoming _Origami_Insects_. I've seen a few of the models, and they are much better."
-- Joseph Wu (July 22, '94)

.............................
"Many of the models in it are very good, some of the best origami insects that I've seen. Since I have no idea what is written, I just follow the symbols, but sometimes special inserts are written which I just have to guess at by looking at the next figures. This is a group of possible models that hasn't been touched yet. 4 out of every 5 creatures is an insect. And with just under 1 million different species to choose from, I don't think we will ever run out of new models to create."
-- Kevin Thorne (May 8, '95)

.............................
"Everyone (including myself) seems to love Robert Lang's new book, "Origami Insects and their Kin". For those of you "insectophiles" (to quote Mr. Lang's introduction to the aforementioned book), I would like to recommend Giunta's Italian book "Origami gli Insetti". It's diagrammed clearly enough so that the Italian text is (merci ...
... s difficult as Mr. Lang's,
they are extremely complex and look very lifelike when finished. Some models which were not also done by Mr. Lang are: rhinoceros beetle, sacred scarab, housefly, caterpillar, moth and a scorpion-like creature with pincers instead of stinger (I don't know its species; "D***it, Jim, I'm an engineer, not an entymologist!"). It's advertised by OUSA is only runs $23. Try it out!"
-- "Iron Will" Dawes (Aug 10, '95)

Go to the contents table

55. Origami Insects, Yoshihide Momotani

# of recommendations: 2
ISBN is 4-416-38824-1.
("Origami Insects")
in Japanese (Mushi No Origami).

.............................
"The book is in Japanese, from the "Origami Land" series. The models are (surprise :-) insects that vary from simple to intermediate, most being modular. They're very impressive looking when complete, though. They must be, or I wouldn't have bought the book twice. :-)
-- Sheila Davis (Nov 8, '94)

......................................
"I like "Origami Insects" a lot, because it shows great realistic insects, which are simple to intermediate to fold. This is achieve by taking a modular approach - for example: An ant from five papers. There are also a scorpion (5 sheets), a spider, a praying mantis and their like. The cicada is one piece though."
-- Oded Streigold (Jan 22, '96)

Go to the contents table

56. Origami Museum Animals I, Akira Yoshizawa

# of recommendations: 2
Published by Kamakura Shobo Publishing Co, March 1987.
ISBN: 0-870-40737-6
Original title in Japanese was "Origami Dokuhon 1",
(published by Kamakura Shobo Publishing Co. ???)

.............................
"One of the few books in English from the Japanese master, for fans of simple, elegant Japanese style. Butterfly, dragon, rabbit, raccoon, hermit crab and a number of birds are quite pleasing. Some very s ...
... such as gorilla."
-- Rob Moes

.............................
"In particular, I recommend anything by yoshizawa that you can get your hands on. His models are not, generally, complex, but really make you think about the creature you're trying to represent. The models frequently take several tries to get right, as they are always very sensitive to the angles you choose, and rarely have distinct landmarks. But they're incredibly rewarding!"
-- Anne LaVin, Jan 19 '94

Go to the contents table

57. Origami Skeleton of Tyrannosaurus Rex, Issei Yoshino (Origami Maple)

# of recommendations: 2

Go to the contents table

58. Origami Transportation , Yoshihide Momotani

# of recommendations: 2
ISBN 4-416-38610-9
simple to high intermediate.
in Japanese.
("Norimono Origami")

.............................
"A large variety of cars, trucks, and airplanes (not all of them fly, mind you). Most of the models are somewhat abstract. Some favorites are the moped, dump truck, cement mixer, helicopter and prop plane."
-- Pat Slider

Go to the contents table

59. OrigamiUSA Convention Annuals, Origami USA

# of recommendations: 2

.............................
"Some of my best new books are the conference proceedings from the last four years of the Origami Center's annual conferences. The folds range from very simple to extremely complex and include, much to my delight, an armadillo (one of the hardest folds I've ever come across, but well worth the trouble). Some of the folds are unremarkable, but there are a number of real gems in these books, and maybe the best thing is that they are ring bound so they *stay flat* while you're working from them."
-- Brad Blumenthal (Jan. 1989)

Go to the contents table

60. Papiroflexia, Eduardo Clemente

# of recommendations: 2

.............................
"...which I really enjoy because it gives me a chance to practice origami and Spanish at the same time."
-- Sonya Manes (Feb 7, '95)

.............................
"Clemente's book is excellent!"
-- Elsa Chen

Go to the contents table

61. Quick and Easy Origami Boxes, Tomoko Fuse

# of recommendations: 2
ISBN 0-87040-939-5.

.............................
"This is an English language book, wire bound, and it comes in a little box that also has about 100 sheets of paper (really nice stuff, too bright colors, some is double sided, and VERY square! (I would really like to know who distributes the paper for this series of books, I have NEVER had problems with the paper not being square)....It is a pricey little book, $17.00 plus tax ... but it's pretty good. I enjoyed it!"
-- Dee Lynch (Apr 14, '95)

...............................
"Jonathan Poh asked about duplication of material in the Fuse Box books 'origami boxes' and 'quick and easy boxes." There is some duplication, but every time Fuse does a book, there are some differences, as she's constantly revising and improving. But I'd go with the Origami Boxes and get my paper elsewhere."
-- Valerie Vann (Mar 4, '96)

Go to the contents table

62. Return To The Fold, John Collins, Don Garwood, Thay Yang

# of recommendations: 2
Published by McGraw-Hill
Publication date: April 1995
ISBN: 0070118531

.............................
"....there is a new book from John Collins, Thay Yang, and Don Garwood that advertises an interactive CD-ROM on the cover. I haven't checked out the CD-ROM (no CD drive, sorry) but the book is pretty worthwhile. It's called "Return to the Fold" from McGraw Hill, if anyone is ...

Go to the contents table

63. ABC of Origami, Eric Kenneway

# of recommendations: 1
BOS Booklet.

.............................
"In addition to his "Complete Origami", Eric Kenneway wrote a column in the BOS magazine, going from A to Z, there are all sorts of intriguing pieces of information. All these columns have been assembled into a single booklet, together with some updates by John Smith and others. This new booklet is available from BOS Supplies. It is every bit as fascinating as "Complete Origami" (but it does not contain any models). If I was having to assemble a set of trivial pursuit questions for origami, this would be my first source."
-- Richard Kennedy (Jan 22, '96)

Go to the contents table

64. Alpine Flowers, Yoshihide Momotani

in Japanese.
ISBN4-900747-04-1

.............................
"Momotani has a whole series of new flower books. There are at least four books in the seasons collection (of which the "Origami Flowers of Early Summer" is a part), as well as books on various locations (I have the "Alpine Flowers" book)."
-- Joseph Wu (Oct 13, '95)

.............................
"Day-Lily, Alpine Rose Bay, Maianthemum, Dryas, Dwarf Cornel, Edelweiss, Bleeding-heart, Black Lily, Bilberry, Clematis, Tripetaleia, Alpine Wintergreen, Globe-Flower, Bramble, Cransebill, Campanula, Arctic Bellflower, Gentian, Primrose"
-- Pamela Saalbach (Oct 16, '95)

Go to the contents table

65. Animal Origami for the Enthusiast, John Montroll

# of recommendations: 1

Go to the contents table

66. Best of Origami, Samuel Randlett

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"Classic but difficult to find except used. Remarkable models from around the world: Ligia Montoya's leaf, Fred R ...
... amingo, Neal Elias' rabbit and others."
-- Rob Moes

Go to the contents table

67. Boxes in One Piece - Fuse

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"Fun and useful!"
-- Janet Hamilton (April 27, 1995)

Go to the contents table

68. Classic Origami, Paul Jackson

# of recommendations: 1

Go to the contents table

69. Classic Origami, P.D. Tuyen

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
I found Tuyen's book interesting, though it does have problems. But I think Joseph slightly missed the point of some of it. The title "Classic Origami" and the references to "basic forms" confused me at first too. After I read the text and saw what his philosophy is, ie that the "classic" means "purist" (square, paper as the material, no cuts, etc.) and that most of the "basic forms" were not the traditional ones we've all come to know, but slightly more advanced (ie further along in the folding sequence) that he developed as the jumping off point for multiple models of his own.
I do wish he had named the "combination folds", which are traditional. But it appears that this is a person who experienced a large part of his early origami life without the aid of books, being taught in the traditional way by his grandfather, and experimenting on his own without much contact with the origami "establishment". The models are not meant to be permanent sculptures, but the sort of ephemeral thing used to entertain a child or where the greatest pleasure is in the folding...
The drawings are quite good (he's an architect & it shows), but have some problems: sometimes the color indicating the side of the paper used is misleading, and some models use 1/3 divisions etc that are not expained. Perhaps he eye-balls these; I used to before I started using parallel lines (to avoid ...
... ric method").
At any rate, this is not a trivial book. It has a lot more substance (26 models) than many recent books I've got (many like coffee table books with lots of arty photos and white space, but few models...), and the bases are interesting to explore. And in keeping with his philosophy, all of the models I've tried are quite successful, ie stay folded well, when made of ordinary 6 inch kami origami PAPER. I like the turtle, dragonfly, rooster & hen, elephant, and the rose. His Form III makes nice letter folds for instance.
The biggest diappointment to me was that the nifty flower on p. 8 in the general text part of the book is not diagrammed. For anyone who needs a hint, Start with step 9 of Form X ...
-- Valerie Vann (July 3, '95)

Go to the contents table

70. La Creacion en Papiroflexia - Vicente Palacios

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"In Spanish, most likely out of print. Interesting styles mostly from Spain and Latin America. A number of ornate bowls, birds, and versions of the famous Pajarita bird. Neal Elias' bullfighter, Fred Rohm's angry goose, and Carlos Costa's rhinoceros are worth finding."
-- Rob Moes

Go to the contents table

71. Early Spring Flowers of Origami, Yoshihide Momotani

in Japanese.
ISBN4-416-39506-X

.............................
"Momotani has a whole series of new flower books. There are at least four books in the seasons collection (of which the "Origami Flowers of Early Summer" is a part), as well as books on various locations (I have the "Alpine Flowers" book)."
-- Joseph Wu (Oct 13, '95)

.............................
"Ornamental Kale, Ume: Japanese Apricot, Japanese Quince, Peach Flower, Inflorescence of Butterbur, Christmas Rose, Japanese Allspice, Adonis, Wild Anemone, Japanes Hamamelis, Barrenwort, Cymbidium, Daphne, Narcissus, Asarabacca
-- Pamela Saalbach (Oct 16, '95)

Go to the contents table

72. Easy Origami, the Biddles

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"Beautiful artwork lifts the book above most others. The designs are perhaps not very stimulating, but clean & economical in the main."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr. 22, '95)

Go to the contents table

73. Fiori in Origami, Gazzera

# of recommendations: 1
in Italian, intermediate, paperback,

.............................
"A nice book, color pictures, also includes stems, leaves, and an origami vase. My second favorite flower book."
-- Janet Hamilton (Sept. 26, 1995)

Go to the contents table

74. Folding Money, Vol. 2

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"This book has money folds for every letter in the alphabet (multiple variations on the same theme), as well as lots of other money folds (chicken, peacock, elephant, clothing, etc.)."
-- Brad Blumenthal (April 1989)

Go to the contents table

75. Math in Motion: Origami in the Classroom, Barbara Pearl

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"One of the best methods I have discovered for working with YOUNG children and beginning adults is Math in Motion.
For the first time I am able to follow the clear and easy instructions. You will find the magazine box, frog, picture frame, a journal and more.There is a Cultural Enrichment section that includes Haiku and other FUN stuff for kids."
-- Nani (May 6, '95)

Go to the contents table

76. North American Animals in Origami, John Montroll

# of recommendations: 1
Published by Dover Publications, May 1, 1995.
ISBN 0486286673.

Go to the contents table

77. Origami, Hideki Sakata

# of recommendations: 1
Published by Japan Publications, June 1, 1984.
ISBN 0-870-40580-2.
Simple.

.............................
"Maybe I should explain that I am never around experienced folders (except at the convention) so I am always asked for books for beginners. These two are the best I know. Sakata is best for rank beginners because of the exceptional clarity of the photo-illustrations. Gray/Kasahara is better for those who want a bit more challenge and/or more information. Given my "audience" a Montroll would be a disaster!"
-- Carol Hall

Go to the contents table

78. Origami: The Art of Paper-Folding, Robert Harbin

# of recommendations: 1
Published by Harperperennial Library, April 1992.
ISBN: 0060922699

.............................
"My copy is a bad yellowed paperback which won't stay open but he really explains a lot about folds."
-- MaryRose Hoare

Go to the contents table

79. Origami Architecture, Yoshide Momotani

in japanese.
Origami Land series.
ISBN 4-416-39014-9

Go to the contents table

80. Origami Dinosaurs, Yoshihide Momotani

.............................
"I also bought Momotani's dinosaur book on the weekend. Hours of fun. For each model."
-- Glenn Reynolds (Aug 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

81. Origami Fish, Yoshihide Momotani.

in Japanese.
ISBN 4-416-38901-9 C8372.

Go to the contents table

82. Origami Flowers of Early Summer, Yoshihide Momotani

in Japanese.
ISBN4-416-39507-8.

.............................
"Flowers covered: Amaranth, Glaucidium, Rhododendron, Bindweed, Rose, Small Anemone, Creeping Lady's Sorrel, White Clover, Peony, Hydrangea, Lily, I ...
... rchid, Weigela.
I haven't listed of the very specific types of these flowers."
-- Pamela Saalbach (Oct 12 '95)

............................
"Momotani has a whole series of new flower books. There are at least four books in the seasons collection (of which the "Origami Flowers of Early Summer" is a part), as well as books on various locations (I have the "Alpine Flowers" book)."
-- Joseph Wu (Oct 13, '95)

Go to the contents table

83. "Origami For Displays", Toshie Takahama

# of recommendations: 1
Published by Charles E Tuttle Co
Publication date: June 1979
ISBN: 4-079-73820-X

Go to the contents table

84. Origami For Parties, by Kazuo Kobayashi & Makoto Yamaguchi

# of recommendations: 1
(ISBN 0-87011-797-1).

.............................
"I was given my first origami book as a gift,... I found it a very clear (and colorful) introduction to origami."
-- Andreas Meyer (Mar 20, 1992)

Go to the contents table

85. Origami Hearts, Francis Ow

# of recommendations: 1

Go to the contents table

86. Origami Inside - Out, by John Montroll

# of recommendations: 1
Published by Dover Publications, August 1, 1993.
ISBN 0486276740.

Go to the contents table

87. Origami Wild Flowers, Yoshihide Momotani

in Japanese.
ISBN4-900747-03-3

.............................
"Momotani has a whole series of new flower books. There are at least four books in the seasons collection (of which the "Origami Flowers of Early Summer" is a part), as well as books on various locations (I have the "Alpine Flowers" book)."
-- Joseph Wu (Oct 13, '95)

.............................
"Vetch, Bird's Trefoil, Corydalis, Mazus, Japanese Honeysuckle, Violet, Coastal Bindweed, Flower of Lagwort, Ca ...
... unk Cabbage, Houttuynie, Harb-Paris, Blue-Eyed Grass, Fan Columbine, Dwarf Lilyturf"
-- Pamela Saalbach (Oct 16, '95)

Go to the contents table

88. Prehistoric Aussigami, Richard Saunders and Brian Mackness

# of recommendations: 1
Lothian Publishing Company, Ltd., Melbourne.
ISBN 0-850-91366-7.

.............................
"I discovered a new book last week that I thought I'd tell you all about it (I'd never seen it before). It's called "Prehistoric Aussiegami", and as the name suggests, it includes models of various dinosaurs and ice age beasties from Down Under. The diagrams for the twelve models in the book are very clear and easy to follow, and the resulting figures are quite nice, although not too complex. It's about the same level of difficulty as "The World of Origami" (by Honda? -- I've forgotten the author momentarily). At $12.95, it was a bit expensive, but I'm a sucker for origami animals."
-- Sheila Wassmer (Jun 6 '91)

Go to the contents table

89. Quick and Easy Origami Christmas, Toshie Takahama

# of recommendations: 1

Go to the contents table

90. Selected Works, by Philip Shen

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"a BOS publication full of exquisite geometric work. Set me off on my creative journey back in '84."
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

91. Spiel und Spass, Paulo Mulatinho

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"Superb draughtsmanship & elegant, ingenious folds. (OK, so one is mine!)"
-- Nick Robinson (Apr. 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

92. Step-by-Step Art of Origami, Jon Tremaine

# of recommendations: 1
date: June 1, 1995
ISBN: 1-551-10243-9

.............................
"Lavish, full of color photos. Mostly decorative designs which show off ornate paper such as giftwrap well. Many ideas for cards, tableware, jewelry and boxes. Good choice for people who want to try a fancy paper project with not much previous folding experience."
-- Rob Moes

Go to the contents table

93. Step by Step Origami, by Paul Jackson

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
PJ presents from an artists point of view, not a craftperson. He looks for style & beauty first"
-- Nick Robinson (Apr 28, '95)

Go to the contents table

94. Wings & Things; Origami That Flies, by Stephen Weiss

# of recommendations: 1
(ISBN 0-312-88228-9).

.............................
"While many of the models aren't strict origami (one involves some cutting), as the title implies, all the models fly. It also contains one of my favorite models, a dollar-bill glider (pg. 31 if you have the book)."
-- Andreas Meyer (20 Mar 92)

Go to the contents table

95. More Origami Hearts, Francis Ow

# of recommendations: 1

Go to the contents table

96. World Unit Origami, Tomoko Fuse

# of recommendations: 1
ISBN 4-416-38826-8

.............................
"If you're into modulars, get World Unit Origami by Tomoko Fuse. I am borrowing it from a friend right now, and it has some incredible stuff in it. It's in Japanese, but Fuse's directions are so clear, it doesn't really matter what language they're in."
-- *ACPQ* (Feb 27, '93)

Go to the contents table

97. Origami Magic, Florence Temko

# of recommendations: 1

.............................
"It doesn't have many models and they are very ...
... nd she did very well with it."
-- Kelly Reed (June 2, '94)

Go to the contents table

Contents table


Last update: 13 August 2008

Comment via: Email to Manager of Origami Information

Wonder what the background of this pages is? Have a look.